Indigenous Thoughts: American Indians, Looking Back, Going Forward by Terra TrevorIt’s Fall, my favorite time of year and the season when the teacher, educator, activist, Native American woman, mother and grandmother in me gets up and roars. Because we’re heading into territory where some Americans celebrate Columbus Day, Halloween, and Thanksgiving in a manner that can leave harmful images and lasting negative impressions. I’m listing a few of my previously published articles and links that shine a bright light on strong, positive views of collective Indianness and the dignity of Native American identity.

Given the current interest in diversity and the demographics of the United States, perhaps many people of many ethnicities, including recent immigrants from throughout the Americas as well as other parts of the world, will find something in this collection that will speak to them with respect to issues of race, identity, culture, community, and representation.

American holiday celebrations that leave lasting negative effects on Native and non-Native minds
Columbus Day
Why Native-inspired Halloween costumes devalues our Indigenous cultures
Thanksgiving: What It Means To This Mixed-Blood American Indian
Thankfulness and Rewriting History (HuffPost)
Native American Heritage Month Braided With Thanksgiving: An American Indian Perspective (HuffPost)

Looking Back, Going Forward
American Indians In Children’s Literature
The People Who Stayed: Southeastern Indian Writing After Removal (University of Oklahoma Press)

California Indians Regathering a Tradition
Dancing To Remember
Tomol Evening
Tomol Trek

10 of my favorite places where you can experience Native American cultures responsibly (Matador Network)

Tending the Fire: Native Voices and Portraits (University of New Mexico Press)

Children of the Dragonfly: Native American Voices on Child Custody and Education (The University of Arizona Press)

Children of the Powwow: Changing The Way We See Native America

American Indians In Children’s Literature By Debbie Reese 
Offering critical perspectives of indigenous peoples in children’s and young adult books, the school curriculum, popular culture, and society.

Oyate is a Native organization working to see that our lives and histories are portrayed with honesty and integrity.

WHEN THE LIGHT OF THE WORLD WAS SUBDUED, OUR SONGS CAME THROUGH A NORTON ANTHOLOGY OF NATIVE NATIONS POETRY. Edited by Joy Harjo

Terra Trevor is a memoirist, essayist, poet and nonfiction writer who draws from her Native roots and the natural world. To find out more about her, visit terratrevor.blogspot.com.